Do We Have a Hidden Bias Against Creative People?

Do We Have a Hidden Bias Against Creative People?

In a recent survey of 1500 CEO’s by IBM’s Institute for Business Value, “creativity” was singled out as the most important leadership characteristic for businesses of the future.
Indeed, we all value and enjoy the creative output of designers, chefs, and out-of-the-box thinkers in all corners of the market.
And we celebrate innovative leaders and entrepreneurs and turn them into rock stars and celebrities.
But interestingly, there is quite a bit of research which suggests that many of us actually have a bias against creative people.

Is This the Key to Being Less “Robotic” on Stage?

is this the key to being less robotic on stage

You know those performances that can only be described as “robotic”? Where there is nothing wrong with it per se, but for whatever reason you are neither engaged nor inspired, and ultimately leave the concert feeling kind of blah and a little empty inside?

I have to admit that I have been accused of delivering such performances on more than a few occasions.

But I don’t think it’s just me. After all, we’re sort of stuck between a rock and hard place. On one hand, we are supposed to be musical, communicative, and fully engaged in the music-making process.

Could the “Aggregation of Marginal Gains” Be the Difference Between Good and Great?

Could the “Aggregation of Marginal Gains” Be the Difference Between Good and Great?

Have you ever had one of those days where music just feels really difficult?

All those notes, compounded by having to worry about intonation, sound production, phrasing, dynamics, rhythm, pacing, and then having to put it all together under pressure?

Sheesh. It’s a lot.

When faced with daunting challenges, whether it’s winning a big audition/major competition, losing 50 lbs, or turning $1000 into $1,000,000, our tendency is to look for the home run.