The Problem with “Perfect” Practice

Mistakes aren’t all bad.
Don’t be afraid to make them –
just don’t ignore them!
(Why the haiku? TMQ)

We know that practice doesn’t make perfect.

(And while we’re on the subject, we might as well admit to ourselves that 100% flawlessness is impossible, and that most of us don’t have what it takes to be a true perfectionist anyhow.)

So that leaves us with a phrase often used in place of the classic aphorism “Practice makes perfect” – namely, “Practice does not make perfect.

Cracked Notes? Squirrely Intonation? Solution May Be Ease-ier Than You Think

Minimal effort
brings maximal performance.
What a paradox!
(Why the haiku? TMQ)

Musicians are often regarded as being a pretty hard-working lot – a reputation that I’d say is probably well-deserved. We often start at a very young age, spend lots of alone time practicing while others are out doing more enjoyable things, and are pretty good about putting in our hours on a consistent basis.

What Does It Take to Have a Thriving Career as a Musician?

What Does It Take to Have a Thriving Career as a Musician?

Recently, I was asked to write a guest post on a relatively new music site. As I did some browsing through the archives to learn more about the folks behind this venture, I found some noteworthy articles that I thought would be of interest to the readers of this blog. String-heavy emphasis, but still very relevant to all the non-string players out there, and all worth Instapaper-ing, if not Evernote-ing.

I’ve never done a post like this, but thought it might be nice to tap into the collective wisdom of others out in the music world.